Tongtapu woman charged for selling medication without licence

Fisi’itiutina Fine’isaloi, the operator of the Fale Koloa Famili Tonga USA Trading store at Haveluloto, has been reportedly charged for selling medication without a licence.

The charges came after Police officers, together with inspectors from the Ministry of Health, raided the premise and confiscated the medication last month.

The company, which is based in Utah, Salt Lake City, claimed on Facebook that its goods being regularly shipped from the Unites States to Nuku’alofa are of “top quality” and prices were considerate.

It said thousands of customers shopped from their store.

However, the Ministry of Health said that the medication that was confiscated was sold without a license.

Fine’isaloi is due to appear in court soon.

It is illegal to sell medication without a licence in Tonga.

The Therapeutic Acts says “Any person who contravenes or fails to comply with any provision of this Act could face a fine not exceeding $2,000, or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, or both; and in the case of a continuing offence, to a fine not exceeding $100 for every day or part of a day during which the offence has continued”.

The Pharmacy Acts states that only registered pharmacists are allowed to sell medication.

“Any person who fails to comply could face a fine not exceeding $1,000, or imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months, or both; and in the case of a continuing offence, to a fine not exceeding $100 for every day or part of a day during which the offence has continued.

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